Album Review: On Breakthrough, it is hard to take MC Galaxy seriously

share on:
Breakthrough MC Galaxy

MC Galaxy was never going to release the album of the year.

A Jack of all trades of sorts, the Akwa Ibom born fellow has attempted a wide variety of talents since his journey to Lagos. He makes music, he dances, he does comedy, he host events, he fights Davido, he entertains. Whatever pays the bills or puts his name out there, bring it and he’s in.

Following the unexpected smash success of his dance hit Sekem, the usual post hit single sequelae must have crept up on MC Galaxy. The pressure to follow up said single with another one just as appealing is all too real and must have hit him so bad . The end product of such a proposition is more often than not another over indulgent badly produced album. MC Galaxy is no different from those who have come before him.

Sekem was such a huge pop culture phenomenon that the man born Innocent Udeme Udofot must have been carried away by the success and began to fancy himself a musician. If musicians deliver albums to their audience, why should he not join the wagon?

A million reasons why actually but we’ll just start with these few.

Breakthrough isn’t really an album, not in the artistic sense of the word. It is another overlong overindulgent pile of insipid material to emanate from one of the industry’s more prominent players. Nothing is breaking through here- not talent, skill or simple pleasure value. Yes there is some form of arrangement to fit a commercial album structure, there is also significant presence of some sing along hooks but seriously, shouldn’t there be more?

Is this the state of pop music today that an album like this is expected to be taken seriously?

MC Galaxy is grateful to God for overseeing his hustle to a huge pay day and he expresses his gratitude on the disc’s opening (Abasi amanam) and closing (Oshe baba) tracks. Having dispatched with such niceties, he launches into the disc’s main themes; girls, dance, plus nothing of depth. The songs blur into each other with none save for the hit singles sticking to memory, more from familiarity than any latent quality. These previously released singes are the nostalgia laced Davido collaboration, Nek unek and the minor love song Iyaya Eh.

Having been around long enough to be familiar with most of the contemporary producers, Galaxy commissions a good number of them (Mr Chidoo, Shizzi, Gospel on d beat, Young D) to assemble beats for him. They must not have taken him seriously. To be fair to them, one cannot imagine say, DJ Coublon losing sleep over an MC Galaxy commission. In this case, the producer of the moment does not even bother to come up with his standard guitar riffs on the thoroughly unenjoyable Katakpo.

Out of the blue, one of his numerous guest artistes may deliver a memorable line or vocal run, like Zinnia does on Bounce, but like the Liam Neeson character in the Taken movies, MC Galaxy will find the good in the song, and kill it with inane repeated chants of bounce your bum bum bounce it.

Occasionally he triumphs on comedy like on the Shizzi produced Waka waka baby where he queries, Don Jazzy na your crush /Wizkid na your crush/you be tipper? But trust that genuine moments of joy or wit are not what this record is about.

After the unforgivably lengthy running time, there is no room for doubt that music isn’t MC Galaxy’s strongest suit. But none can blame him for lack of trying. It takes a certain level of self-confidence-or deprecation- to open oneself for interrogation in this manner.

The good part is MC Galaxy can cross making an album of his bucket list. The bad part is we cannot retrieve the time spent indulging his delusions.

 

–  Wilfred Okiche

Wilfred Okiche

Wilfred Okiche

Wilfred Okiche is a movie buff and music head. He is still waiting for that one record that will change his life and remains ever optimistic. You can follow him on Twitter @drwill20

2 comments

  1. Wilfred this is some solid review mahn, your descriptive skill deserves a pulitzer award… good job. Someone needs to speak out against mediocre music

Leave a Reply