Ghana builds: ‘Africa’s tallest building’ set for $10 billion tech city

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Better days are emerging for Africa as the world recognizes the continent’s seriousness in advancing its techno-nomy. Ghana’s “10$ billion Hope City Project was spotlighted by CNN. When Ghanaian President John Mahama launched it earlier this month, he stated that the $10 billion high-tech hub aimed to foster technological growth and attract major players in the global ICT industry to the West African country

The ambitious project is the brainchild of Ghanaian businessman Roland Agambire, head of local technology group RLG Communications. Smart and futuristic, the hub’s sustainable facilities will include an assembly plant for various tech products, business offices, an IT university and a hospital, as well as housing and recreation spaces, including restaurants, theaters and sports centers.

“What is lacking in the African continent is a place where you can have well-designed products, backed with concrete research and proper hardware and software developers to be able to create infrastructure for the telecoms industry,” says Agambire, 39, whose company has acquired the land where the technopolis will be built.

“So the inspiration behind Hope City is to have an iconic ICT park where ICT players from all over the world can converge to design, fabricate and export software and everything arising from this country,” he adds.

Construction is expected to begin by June 2013 and when completed — within three years, if everything goes as planned — the technology park could house 25,000 residents and create jobs for 50,000 people.

Hope City will be developed in an area of about 1.5 million square meters, located some 30 minutes west of Accra’s city center.

Designed by Italian firm Architect OBR, the technopolis will be made up of six towers of different dimensions, including a 75-story, 270 meter-high building that is expected to be the highest in Africa. A system of bridges at different heights will link the towers together, creating a circular connection between the buildings’ functions and public amenities.

The full scoop can be read on CNN

Segun Adekoye

Segun Adekoye

A rolling stone. A Netnerd. An idea laboratoire. I'm a strategist. Personal Blog. Follow me on Twitter @segunsd

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